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Full text of "Circular"




SWAIN SCHOOL OF DESIGN 



The William Rotch Rodman Mansion is listed on the National Register 
of Historic Places and is used as the Administration Building. The 
Admissions Office is on the first floor. Top: The Swam Stable is the 
college's oldest building (circa 1810) and still has the wrought iron 
horse feeders. It houses guest artists and the Supply Store. 




Swain School of Design has 
undergone significant changes in 
the last year. We have doubled our 
programs, doubled our faculty, 
doubled our facility, and dou- 
bled our budget. Swain's identity 
has always been as a small, 
established (1881) art school. 
However, we knew that in order 
to prosper in today's competitive 
educational environment, Swain needed to expand. In this catalogue, we 
hope to give you a closer look at the "new" Swain School of Design, and 
what it can mean for you. 

The cover of this catalogue introduces a new institutional seal for the 
college. You will see shapes and lines which convey images relevant to 
Swain. The eye is the most important symbol and promotes our most 
important function: teaching students to perceive their world with 
greater skill, sensitivity and acuity. 

The sample of parallel lines and the fish shape convey our closeness and 
fascination with the sea. New Bedford is one of the nation's leading 
seaports. The beautiful beaches of Massachusetts and Rhode Island 
stretch above and below New Bedford bordering Long Island Sound, 
Buzzard's Bay, Cape Cod Bay, and the Atlantic Ocean. The sea touches 
the people of New Bedford with its bounty, its rhythm, its laws, its 
power, and its beauty. The fish symbolizes freedom because of its ability 
to move freely in many directions. 

The geometric shape in the background reminds us of the importance of 
shape, edge, and contour to the artist's world as it is made manifest in a 
piece of sculpture, a ceramic cup, a portrait, or the magnificent historic 
architecture of New Bedford. 

With all of the freshness and recent developments, the Swain School of 
Design has a well articulated, tra- 
ditionally formatted Bachelor of 
Fine Arts Degree program. It is 
still a small school which prides 
itself on a close, intensive, indi- 
vidually centered instructional 
approach. 

Studying art means studying 
yourself and your world. Join us, 
if you will, by the sea. 






Bruce H. Yenawine 
President 




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TABLE OF CONTENTS 



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General Information 

I Curriculum 

5 Bachelor of Fine Arts 

49 Master of Fine Arts 
Program in Artisanry 

Policies and Procedures 

5 I Housing 

53 Student Life 

55 Admissions 

60 Faculty, Administration 
and Trustees 

63 Tuition and Fees 

64 Financial Aid 

65 Maps 






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PURPOSE 

The purpose of the Swain School 
of Design is to educate men and 
women to become professional 
artists, craftsmen and designers. 
Swain offers specialized and 
intensive undergraduate and 
graduate programs intended to 
foster the student's individual 
growth through the close atten- 
tion of the faculty. As a result, 
students can develop their crea- 
tive, technical and artistic abili- 
ties and produce works which are 
thoughtful, vibrant contribu- 
tions to the culture as a whole. 







ACCREDITATIONS 
AND AFFILIATIONS 



The Melville 
Library is named 
after its 1 9th 
century tenant — 
Catherine Melville 
Hoadley, Herman 
Melville's sister. 
The house accom- 
modates the 
college library, the 
slide library, and 
media center as 
well as study 
spaces and infor- 
mal reading areas. 




Swain is an accredited institu- 
tional member of the National 
Association of Schools of Art and 
Design. The college is accepted 
by the Veterans Administration 
for the education of veterans and 
authorized by the United States 
Department of Justice to enroll 
non-immigrant alien students. 

The Swain School of Design is a 
fully participating member of the 
Southeastern Association for 
Cooperation in Higher Education 
in Massachusetts (SACHEM), a 
consortium of nine area colleges 
and universities. Through 
SACHEM, Swain students may 
enroll in selected courses at other 
member institutions at no extra 
cost. Other groups or associa- 
tions with which the college is 
affiliated: Art College Exchange; 
National Association for Student 
Financial Assistance; The Ameri- 
can Federation of Art; The Art 
Librarians Society of North 
America; The College Art Asso- 
ciation; The College Board; The 
Council for the Advancement 
and Support of Education; The 
National Association of College 
Admissions Counselors; The 
New England Association of 
College Admissions Counselors; 
The New England Association of 
Collegiate Registrars & Admis- 
sions Officers; National Asso- 
ciation for Student Financial 
Assistance. 




The members of the ART 
COLLEGE EXCHANGE (ACE) 
are: 

Art Academy of Cincinnati 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Corcoran School of Art 
Washington, D.C. 

Kendall School of Design 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Maryland College of 

Art and Design 

Silver Spring, Maryland 

Memphis College of Art 
Memphis, Tennessee 

Milwaukee Institute 
of Art and Design 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

Montserrat School of Visual Art 
Beverly, Massachusetts 

Moore College of Art 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Munson-William-Proctor 
Institute, School of Art 
Utica, New York 

Pacific Northwest 
College of Art 
Portland, Oregon 

Pennsylvania Academy of the 

Fine Arts 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Portland School of Art 
Portland, Maine 

Ringling School of Art 
Sarasota, Florida 

Swain School of Design 
New Bedford, Massachusetts 



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The Swain School of Design is located in New Bedford, Massachu- 
setts. As a place to live and study, New Bedford combines the many 
advantages of a small city with the pleasure of being close to Boston, 
Providence, Newport and the beaches of Cape Cod. The area offers a 
diversity of historical, cultural, and recreational opportunities. One 
can visit the museums and galleries in Boston or Providence, browse 
the bookstores of Harvard Square, tour the many historic estates in 
Newport, or explore beautiful Cape Cod. Swain's annual bus trip to 
New York City extends these opportunities. 

New Bedford is a city whose fine seaport enabled it to become a 
whaling capital of the world in the eighteenth and early nineteenth 
centuries. The importance of New Bedford whaling is demonstrated 
by the collections in the Old Dartmouth Historical Society's Whaling 
Museum and by the fine mansions constructed from whaling fortunes. 
Herman Melville describes these same grand homes in Moby Dick. 
As whaling declined in the last half of the nineteenth century, New 
Bedford's textile industry developed, making the city one of the 
country's leading textile centers. At the peak of the textile industry in 
the early twentieth century, New Bedford had seventy mills and pro- 
duced the finest cotton cloth in the world. Much of the area's fine 
domestic, ecclesiastical and commercial architecture dates from this 
era of textile wealth. 

Within recent years, a number of organizations, including the 
Waterfront Historic Area LeaguE (WHALE), the Old Dartmouth 
Historical Society and the City of New Bedford, have joined forces to 
restore and rehabilitate the buildings of architectural importance in 
the waterfront and adjoining districts. Six of Swain's buildings are 
historic properties and reflect the tastes of those who prospered 
during the whaling and textile eras. Today, many of New Bedford's 
industries — especially fishing, seafood processing and apparel 
manufacturing — derive from the city's earlier economy. Tourism 
and historic preservation highlight the accomplishments of the 
past and provide resources which complement the programs at the 
Swain School of Design. 






The 1 903 Swam Circular 
stated that the school's 
objective was to promote 
"further cooperation 
between the designer and 
the workman that the results 
of their work will be of a 
higher quality." 




HISTORY 

The Swain School of Design was established in 1881 
through the provisions of the will of William W. 
Swain, a New Bedford philanthropist, making it 
the twelfth oldest art school in the United States. 
Originally, the school was free to those who could 
not afford an education beyond public school. As 
the textile industry became increasingly important 
to New Bedford, the school concentrated on instruc- 
tion in design. In the 1950's and 1960's, undergrad- 
uate degree programs in painting, printmaking, 
sculpture and graphic design were developed. The 
Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree granting authority was 
added to the School's charter on July 18, 1969 by an 
act of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Beginning in the Fall of 1985 , Swain began offering 
undergraduate and graduate degrees in ceramics, 
fiber, metal, and wood as part of a transfer agree- 
ment with Boston University's Program in Arti- 
sanry (PIA). Established in 1975, the PIA has 
developed a strong reputation in the national crafts 
field. In addition, Swain designed and introduced in 
1985 the architectural artisanry program resulting 
in a one year certificate as well as a baccalaureate 
degree. 

The fine arts, graphic design, artisanry and crafts 
programs supported by the liberal arts curriculum 
combine to create an educational institution rich in 
artistic, intellectual, technical and professional 
opportunities. 





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BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS 




Left: Swain faculty member Ben 
Martinez joins his students in 
drawing from a live model. 
Right: Swain's Foundation pro- 
gram stresses fundamental skills, 
especially drawing. Students are 
expected to put in long hours to 
complete Foundation assignments. 



The Swain School of Design 
offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts 
Degree (B.F.A.) for training pro- 
fessional artists in nine major 
studio areas. Degree candidates 
experience a structured and cohe- 
sive program that will form an 
excellent basis for lifelong activ- 
ity and growth in the visual arts. 
The studio areas are Architec- 
tural Artisanry, Ceramics, Fiber, 
Graphic Design, Metals, Paint- 
ing, Printmaking, Sculpture and 
Wood. Architectural Artisanry is 
a new major developed in 1985 
by the Swain School of Design. 
Ceramics, Fiber, Metals and 
Wood are new majors to the 
Swain School of Design as a 
result of a transfer of the Program 
in Artisanry (PIA) from Boston 
University to Swain School of 
Design in the summer of 1985 . 

The B.F.A. program is a four year 
program that includes both the 
study of studio arts and liberal 
arts. (Transfer students are 
required to spend at least two 
full years at Swain School of 
Design dependent on evaluation 
of previous course work.) The 
curriculum in studio arts focuses 
on professional skills and values 
specific to the visual arts. The 



study of the liberal arts builds 
skills in writing and reading as 
well as an awareness of art his- 
tory, cultural history and con- 
temporary society. Students take 
courses in both curricular areas 
every semester. 

The academic year is divided into 
two, fifteen week semesters. The 
Fall semester begins in Septem- 
ber and the Spring semester 
begins in January. Full-time 
student status requires a mini- 
mum of 12 credit hours per 
semester. An average courseload 
is 15 credit hours per semester. 
A maximum of 18 credits per 
semester is allowed. Studio art 
courses require 6 clock hours per 
week for every 3 credit hours (a 
ratio of 2: 1) while liberal art 
courses require 3 clock hours for 
3 credit hours (a ratio of 1: 1). 
The total number of credits 
required to complete the B.F.A. 
degree is 126. 

Part-time study is encouraged. 
Part-time students may take 3- 
1 1 credits each semester. Part- 
time students must register for at 
least 9 credits to obtain a major 
studio space on a space available 
basis. 




Vice President 
Michael Croft is a 
metalsmith and 
also currently 
serves as President 
of the Society of 
North American 
Goldsmiths. 





The Foundation Program 
The freshman year of study is 
called the Foundation program. 
Students complete a one year 
course of study which develops 
perceptual, technical, and con- 
ceptual skills and prepares the 
student for concentration in a 
major studio area. The Founda- 
tion program includes studying 
two-dimensional and three- 
dimensional design, color and 
drawing. 



Trial Major Program The sopho- 
more year of study is called the 
Trial Major program. Students 
in the first semester select three, 
3-credit hour courses from any 
of the nine studio areas to study. 
In the second semester students 
must select one, 6-credit hour 
course in one area of concentra- 
tion. They also register for one 3- 
credit hour course selected from 
any of the remaining eight areas 
of study. At the end of the sopho- 
more year, the students partici- 
pate in a review by the faculty to 
formally declare his/her studio 
major in one of the Trial Major 
areas. This concept is unique to 
the Swain program and allows 
the student to gain direct studio 
experience and knowledge before 
committing to a studio major. 



The Major Studio Program 

The student becomes a studio 
major in the junior year after 
successfully passing the sopho- 
more review by the faculty. The 
student develops individual 
direction through concentrated 
studio work while continuing to 
master the technical and aesthetic 
aspects of the chosen medium. 
Each semester the student com- 
pletes 9 studio credits in the 
major as a result of structured 
negotiation between the student 
and faculty of their program. 
Majors are required to present 
portfolios of work for review 
by the faculty during both the 
junior and senior years. Major 
Studio courses are augmented 
by studio electives and liberal 
art courses. 



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FOUNDATION S 



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The Foundation program has 
been designed to develop the 
technical, perceptual, and verbal 
skills of each individual student. 
The program seeks to discover 
and/or reinforce the unique tal- 
ents and points of view that each 
student has inherently. Capable 
and bright people come together 
for many hours each day to expe- 
rience a wide range of materials 
and processes. 






The curriculum promotes per- 
ceptual analysis and visual prob- 
lem solving through work 
executed in two and three dimen- 
sions. The program uses the 
traditional device of understand- 
ing design by translating three 
dimensional volumes, rhythms, 
and structures into two- 
dimensional compositions. A 
primary objective of the Founda- 
tion program is to help the stu- 
dent understand the effect of 
form on content and meaning. 



Beyond formally scheduled class- 
time, students are expected to be 
in the studio to complete the 
often demanding assignments. 
The program also prepares the 
student for concentrated study in 
their chosen major areas. 

The Foundation program's two- 
dimensional design, drawing and 
three-dimensional design studios 
are in the Purchase Street Building. 




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Foundation Studio Program: 
Course Descriptions 

Drawing This course explores 
the nature of line, form, shape, 
texture, perspective, scale, mass, 
volume, and contrast. The dual 
focus of the course is observa- 
tional skill building and eye- 
hand coordination. Subject 
matter varies from still life to the 
study of the figure and human 
anatomy. Pencil, charcoal, 
chalks, conte and pastel crayons, 
markers, and pen and ink are 
introduced and applied. 



Three-Dimensional Design 
Freshman 3D introduces the 
vocabulary of three dimensional 
design: those ideas and concepts 
that concern themselves with 
structure and spacial organiza- 
tion used in addressing and solv- 
ing basic sculptural problems. 
This course also covers a series of 
problems each dealing with a 
specific aspect of three dimen- 
sional design: mass, space, vol- 
ume, scale, light, balance, line, 
plane, color, and texture as they 
relate to the total vocabulary 
of three-dimensional design. 
Emphasis is placed on developing 
technical and manual skills to 
facilitate the translation of 
abstract ideas into tangible 
objects. 



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Color/Two Dimensional Design 
This course introduces the princi- 
ples underlying two-dimensional 
organization and teaches the use 
of line, shape, space, value, 
texture, and pattern. This course 
explores the physical properties 
of color and the physics of light 
interaction. Various assignments 
deal with color perception, and 
how color is mixed, manipulated 
and applied. The course is pre- 
sented as a sequence of problems 
exploring two-dimensional rela- 
tionships and various color 
theories, particularly through 
the work of Albers and Itton. 
Assignments are solved in both 
black and white and color 
mediums. Materials include 
paint, pen and ink, acrylic, paper 
and card collage, and pencil. 



TRIAL MAJOR 



Profile: Foundations 



Full-time Faculty: Richard Dougherty, Director 

Square Footage: 2,400 

Location: Purchase Street Building 

Key Equipment: 30 Easels, 35 Drawing Horses, 
30 Drawing Tables 





Trial Major In the sophomore 
year students are encouraged 
to explore the studio major 
areas: Architectural Artisanry, 
Ceramics, Fiber, Graphic 
Design, Metals, Painting, Print- 
making, Sculpture and Wood, 
and then to begin to focus more 
intensely on a single area of 
study. In the first semester of the 
sophomore year, students elect 
introductory studio courses in 
any three of the nine studio areas. 
In this way, students can sample 
the range of aesthetic attitudes 
and specialized techniques 
offered by various programs. At 
the end of this semester students 
are required to present a body of 
work from all courses for review 
by the entire faculty. 



In the second semester students 
must select an area of concentra- 
tion, a Trial Major, in which they 
will work for two full days a 
week (6 credits). At this time 
students may be assigned indi- 
vidual studio space (as available) 
in that program's facility. Stu- 
dents will, in addition, elect 
another introductory studio 
course in a program outside the 
chosen area of concentration. At 
the end of the sophomore year, 
students must declare a major. 
In order to enter a major studio 
program, a student must have 
completed at least six credits in 
that area and be accepted by the 
areas' faculty as a result of portfo- 
lio review. 






LIBERAL ARTS 

Courses in liberal arts seek to 
promote personal and profes- 
sional development and to open 
up perspectives on the past, 
present and future. A total of 36 
credit hours is required for the 
B.F.A. degree, consisting of 18 
credits in English and humani- 
ties, 12 credits in visual studies 
(including art history) and 6 
credits in social studies and natu- 
ral sciences. Freshman English, 
Readings in Western Civiliza- 
tion, and Introduction to Art 
History are offered every year. 
Other courses, with wide rang- 
ing topics, are offered every two 
or three years in rotation. 

Graduate seminars are available 
to upper level majors and M.F.A. 
candidates. Through a cooper- 
ative program with colleges 
and universities in Southeastern 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 
additional specialized liberal arts 
courses are available and transfer- 
able. Schedules of classes at local 
colleges are available in the Reg- 
istrar's office. 



"One of the true pleasures of teaching comes from 
helping to enhance a student's appreciation for the 
variety of means human beings have employed to give 
form to their experience. Through the study of histori- 
cally important examples, students examine the proc- 
ess of acquiring knowledge of personal, social or natural 
events and of organizing the knowledge in patterns that 
are stable and convincing." — Jim Bobrick 




Profile: Liberal Arts 



Full-time Faculty: James Bobrick, Charles Licka, 
Patricia Scott 

Square Footage: 1,200 

Location: Melville Library, Elm St. Building and 
Purchase Street Building 








THE MAJORS 




Architectural 
Artisanry 

Ceramics 

Fiber 



Graphic 
Design 



Metals 

Painting 

Printmaking 

Sculpture 



Wood 



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This highly ornamented Italianate house is an 
example of the superb quality of architec- 
ture which populates the County Street 
Historic District. 




The Architectural Artisanry students learn 
how to use a wide range of tools and 
technologies to construct architectural 
details and ornaments. 





The Architectural Artisanry major provides for the 
education of a new generation of artisans knowl- 
edgeable about ornamental design and architecture, 
skilled in historic preservation and building con- 
struction techniques, and creative in adaptive reuse 
of old, underutilized buildings. This program seeks 
to educate ornamental plasterers; metal workers; 
decorative brick, stone, and concrete masons; wood 
cabinet makers; ornamental carpenters; and archi- 
tectural ceramic artists, among other occupations. 
Swain's educational resources are comprehensive 
enough to prepare artisans to satisfy a wide range of 
employment opportunities in the fields of architec- 
tural restoration, rehabilitation or new construction 

This program is unique in the nation because of its 
ability to integrate traditional trade techniques 
training with contemporary craft practices with 
fundamental design theory. Architectural Artisanry 
benefits from the combined strength of Swain's 
mature programs in the traditional craft areas 
(wood, metal, ceramics, fiber) and New Bedford's 
extraordinary inventory of architecture. 



Students may elect to enter one of two programs, 
varying in duration, intensity, and goals. The one 
year Certificate Program in Architectural Artisanry 
is designed to augment the professional skills of 
those already working in the field. In the four year 
B.F.A. degree, students may elect to concentrate in 
Architectural Artisanry, or otherwise design a degree 
program that combines their study of architecture 
and applied artisanry with a concentration in a par- 
ticular art or craft (e.g. metal, ceramics, fiber, 
wood, painting, etc.) 

The Architectural Artisanry curriculum draws fac- 
ulty from the many professional artisans, architects, 
and historians who are otherwise employed in New 
England. Architectural Artisanry has its own wood 
shop and studio but makes extensive use of the other 
major studios of the School. Students will complete 
portfolio pieces intended to document technical 
proficiency and aesthetic distinction and quality. 
Students work on actual building sites and directly 
experience the world of the architect, builder, devel- 
oper and contractor. 



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Architectural Artisanry 
Sample Curriculum 



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Fo// Semester 

Drawing #121 3 credits 

2 D Design #111 3 credits 

3D Design #151 3 credits 

English #H 1 00 3 credits 

Readings in Western Civilization 3 credits 

Total 1 5 credits 

Spring Semester 

Drawing #122 3 credits 

2D Design #112 3 credits 

3D Design #152 3 credits 

English #H 1 05 3 credits 

Art History #VS 1 00 3 credits 

Total 1 5 credits 



Profile: Architectural Artisanry 



Degrees Offered: A. A. Certificate, B.F.A. 

Full-time Faculty: Philip C. Marshall, Director 

Square Footage: 2,000 

Location: Rodman Carriage House 

Key Equipment: 16 Individual Lending Tool Boxes, 
Band Saw, Drill Press, Disk Sander, Wood Lathe 



Trial Major Year 




Fall Semester 




Architectural Artisanry #200 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


History of Architecture 1 


3 credits 


Color Theory 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Architectural Artisanry #201 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


History of Architecture II 


3 credits 


Architectural Drawing 


3 credits 


Total 


1 5 credits 


Junior Year 




Fall Semester 




Artisanry Studio 1 


6 credits 


Materials & Techniques 1 


3 credits 


Architectural Elements 1 


3 credits 


Materials Conservation 


6 credits 


Total 


/ 8 credits 


Spring Semester 




Artisanry Studio II 


6 credits 


Materials & Techniques II 


3 credits 


Architectural Elements II 


3 credits 


Theory of Ornament 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Senior Year 




Fall Semester 




Architectural Artisanry Major 


6 credits 


Preservation Business Practice 


3 credits 


Senior Project 


3 credits 


Academic Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Architectural Artisanry Major Studios 


6 credits 


Cooperative Placement 


9 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 







This is a sample curriculum only. Subject to change 
based on semester class schedules and individual 
needs. 



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Swain's Rodman Mansion Building was 
constructed in 1 833. It was designed by the 
prominent Greek Revival architect, Russell 
Warren. Architectural Artisanry students 
have completed the condition analysis on 
this building. 






CERAMICS 



Ceramics is the study of pottery and sculpture 
executed in clay. Majors explore clay as an expres- 
sive medium, learning clay and glaze chemistry, 
and kiln technology to prepare them as professional 
ceramicists. The Ceramics program balances tradi- 
tional and nontraditional approaches and encourages 
both sculptural and functional applications. In the 
studio students consider the relationship between 
the intellectual and the intuitive, the aesthetic and 
the technical, the historical and the contemporary, 
the visual and the verbal. Within a given structure, 
students must seek and find their own personal 
directions and solutions. 



Rick Hirsch's raku 
fired ceramic 
vessel demon- 
strates both the 
sculptural and 
traditional poten- 
tial of the medium. 
Opposite: This 
stoneware jar of 
Chris Gustin's is 
22"x2l"x2l". 




Construction of clay forms is 
taught through the joining of 
units (coil and slab), casting, and 
wheel throwing. Students alter 
the surface of the clay by glazing, 
staining, painting, carving, and 
embellishing to explore the two 
dimensional aspects of the 
medium. The technology of 
firing clay to achieve different 
visual and physical properties is 
taught through the operation of 
electric and gas fired kilns in the 
Ceramics facility. 



Fortified by the historical and 
technical information, students 
are encouraged to bring their 
own contemporary vision to their 
work. 

Students in ceramics attend slide 
lectures, critiques, and demon- 
strations by visiting ceramic 
artists and are exposed to a spec- 
trum of styles and philosophies. 
Through participation with the 
National Council on Education 
of the Ceramic Arts annual con- 
ference, students and faculty gain 
direct access to the profession and 
develop a network of colleagues 
and friends. 




"Teaching is about communicating. Expressing in thoughts 
and in deeds, ideas, opinions and questions related to the 
student's entire being, not just their isolated art problems. 
The teacher's role is to act as a sort of catalyst. Between 
the student and the artistic — problem placed before them. 
It's a very difficult profession and of course ultimately both 
student and teacher get educated." — Richard Hirsch 




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Many undergraduate students 
completing the B.F.A. degree in 
Ceramics go to graduate school. 
With an understanding of their 
materials and the history of the 
Ceramic Arts, all graduates are 
prepared to pursue their careers 
as practicing craftspersons and 
artists. 



The Ceramics area in the Elm 
Street Building includes large, 
well lighted individual work 
studios and rooms for the pro- 
grams slide collection, glaze 
calculation and air brush appli- 
cation, sand blasting, spraying, 
claymixing, and kilns. 






Students learn clay and glaze chemistry in 
order to gam greater control over the effect 
of firing. 






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Ceramics Sample Curriculum 

Foundation Year 

Fall Semester 

Drawing #121 3 credits 

2 D Design #111 3 credits 

3 D Design #151 3 credits 
English #H 1 00 3 credits 
Readings in Western Civilization 3 credits 
Total 1 5 credits 

Spring Semester 

Drawing # 1 22 3 credits 

2D Design #112 3 credits 

3D Design #152 3 credits 

English #H 1 05 3 credits 

Art History #VS 1 00 3 credits 

Total 1 5 credits 



Trial Major Year 




Fall Semester 




Ceramics #201 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Ceramics #202 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Junior Year 




Fall Semester 




Ceramics Major 


9 credits 


Kiln Building 


3 credits 


Ceramics History 


3 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 8 credits 


Spring Semester 




Ceramics Major 


9 credits 


Clay and Glazes 


3 credits 


Ceramics History 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Total 


18 credits 


Senior Year 




Fall Semester 




Ceramics Major 


9 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Business Management 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Ceramics 


9 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Senior Seminar 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 



This is a sample curriculum only. Subject to change 
based on semester class schedules and individual 
needs. 



Profile: Ceramics 



Degrees Offered: B . F. A . , M . F. A . 

Studio Space for Majors: 30 

Full-time Faculty: Christopher Gustin, Richard 
Hirsch 

Square Footage: 12,000 

Location: Elm Street Building 

Key Equipment: 30 Electric Ceramic Wheels, 
12 Kick Wheels, Sandblaster, Forklift, 2-30 cu.ft. 
Downdraft Gas Kilns, 1-75 cu.ft. Car Gas Kiln, 
1-110 cu.ft. Walk-In Gas Kiln, 1-30 cu.ft. Soda Gas 
Kiln, 5 Varying Capacity Electric Kilns, Walker 
Pug Mill, 6' x 8' Spray Booth, Brent Slab Roller, 
400 lb. Capacity Clay Mixer 




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Two radically different approaches to low 
fire ceramics: a figurative sculpture and a 
decorative vessel. 



FIBER 




Fiber is the flexible medium involving both the 
structuring and patterning of cloth. The Fiber pro- 
gram is centered on weaving and surface design. In 
weaving, cloth is built thread by thread construct- 
ing images and textures through the structural 
interlacing of fibers. In surface design, images and 
patterns are applied through silk screen processes, 
hand painting, dyeing and stitching paste resist. 
The curriculum allows students to receive basic 
instruction in both areas, then concentrate or com- 
bine their interests. 

Students first learn such fundamentals as: dyeing 
with fiber reactive dyes, the study of pattern, block 
printing, silk screen printing, four harness weaving, 
pattern drafting and double weaves. Upper level 
projects emphasize content, advanced techniques, 
and historic and contemporary sources. Students 
can explore multiple harness weaves, dyed warps 
and wefts, supplementary warps, photo-silkscreen, 
African and Japanese paste resists, indigo dyeing, as 
well as research in historic textiles and investigating 
contemporary fiber artists. Individual expression is 
encouraged, whether a student pursues gallery or 
commission oriented work, limited production of 
woven or printed textiles, or garment construction. 




"In a wide variety of cultures with strongly developed textile traditions, artists have evolved many ingenious methods of 
applying color and pattern to cloth, and by those means, of enriching the visual world. In addition, those cloths have been 
symbolic, creating and defining various cultural roles and environments. These definitions and gestures are an affirmation 
of life. Within this framework I see patterns and repeats as a symbolic ordering of the fragments of life. I continue to 
be stimulated by the variety, the richness and the essentially humanizing qualities of textile art. My teaching is an effort 
to communicate this excitement; my work is in part a response to it. In my work in Shibori, I am interested in the 
subtlety of the images — hard edges versus soft edges, sharp images versus fuzzy ones, and the rich range of value 
that is possible." — Barbara Goldberg 






Lectures, demonstrations and crits present technical 
data, visual information and explore philosophical 
issues. The program brings in visiting artists who 
specialize in areas such as garment design and con- 
struction design for industry, felting, off-loom and 
three dimensional constructions, and machine knit- 
ting. Field trips to the Museum of Fine Arts — 
Boston's outstanding textile collection, and the 
American Museum of Textiles are arranged along 
with visits to the many local textile printing and 
weaving mills. 

The Fiber studio includes individual work spaces, 
a large fabric printing shop, spacious loom rooms, 
separate graduate studios for both weaving and 
surface design, a comprehensive dyeing facility, 
a photo silkscreen darkroom, an off-loom room, 
a felting room, yarn and fabric stores, and a sewing 
room. The facilities are spacious and diverse enough 
to allow exploration in areas such as off- loom, felt 
making, quilting, and garment construction. 




"There are three major goals in my teaching. The first is to teach students the fundamentals of weaving. The second is to 
initiate a creative use of these techniques into a search for form, function and expression. The third is to study the 
function of textiles both historic and current. These goals are not reached sequentially but simultaneously, the emphasis 
depending on the experience of the student. The study of art is about personal expression, and it is also a direct reflec- 
tion of the times we live in. But looking into the past we are at the same time learning about the present, as we are 
always interpreting the past with a modern eye." — Barbara Eckhardt 










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Fiber Sample Curriculum 

Foundation Year 

Fall Semester 

Drawing #121 3 credits 

2 D Design #11! 3 credits 

3D Design #151 3 credits 

English #H 1 00 3 credits 

Readings in Western Civilization 3 credits 

Total 1 5 credits 

Spring Semester 

Drawing # 1 22 3 credits 

2D Design #112 3 credits 

3D Design #152 3 credits 

English #H 1 05 3 credits 

Art History #VS 1 00 3 credits 

Total 1 5 credits 



Trial Major Year 




Fall Semester 




Surface Design 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Weaving 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Junior Year 




Fall Semester 




Fiber Major 


9 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Fiber History 


3 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Total 


18 credits 


Spring Semester 




Fiber Major 


9 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Fiber History 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 8 credits 


Senior Year 




Fall Semester 




Fiber Major 


9 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Business Management 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Fiber Major 


9 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Senior Seminar 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 



This is a sample curriculum only. Subject to change 
based on semester class schedules and individual 
needs. 



Students approach fiber construction from 
both and on-loom and off-loom perspective. 







Profile: Fibers 





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Degrees Offered: B.F.A., M.F.A. 

Studio Space for Majors: 18 Weaving/ 15 Surf. Design 
Majors 

Full-time Faculty: Barbara Eckhardt, Barbara 
Goldberg 

Square Footage: 18,000 

Location: Purchase Street Building 

Key Equipment: Vacuum Exposing Unit, Spinning 
Carding & Warping Equip. , Stainless steel Dye 
Pots, Felting Facilities, Large Steam Cabinet, 
Large Stove (Industrial), Large Industrial Washing 
Machine, Large Industrial Dryer, 23 Floor Looms 
Multi-Harness, 7 Small Size Floor Looms, 12 Inkle 
Looms, 1 Knitting Machine, 2 Industrial Sewing 
Machines, 3 Portable Sewing Machines, 6 Large 
Padded Printing Tables, Dark Room-large Format 
Enlarger, Vacuum Exposing Table 



GRAPHIC DESIGN 



Graphic Design is a problem- 
solving process that requires 
knowledge of artistic expression 
and theory, culture, symbols, 
history, business, and technology. 
Graphic designers apply their 
skills to various communications 
problems. Solutions may take the 
form of a poster, a corporate 
image, a signage system, a book 
or a package. The design process 
remains the same. Students learn 
to research a problem, analyze a 
client's needs and produce a solu- 
tion that is aesthetically and 
functionally effective. 



The Graphic Design program is 
structured to develop each stu- 
dent's personal design process 
and places a high priority on the 
individual as a responsible com- 
municator involved from concept 
through final realization. 



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Majors begin by learning the basic language of 
graphic design: letterforms, typography, photog- 
raphy, illustration, production and reproduction. 
In class, students discuss how signs and symbols 
are made and how they relate to human behavior. 
Projects become increasingly complex through 
assignments that develop both theoretical and 
applied problem-solving skills. 





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"Design-Plus" is a course structured as a working 
studio. Commissions from non-profit organizations 
provide real projects. Students work as a team or 
individually with the instructor. Before graduating, 
students are required to serve an internship with a 
graphic design studio or other art department. This 
internship familiarizes students with the demands of 
the design profession. Through Design-Plus and the 
internship students gain printed examples of work 
for their portfolio. 

Students in design participate in seminars with 
designers from outside the school. Lectures, trips to 
printers and other vendors broaden the student's 
understanding of the profession. Through Swain's 
student chapter of the American Institute of 
Graphic Arts (AIGA), students gain access to publi- 
cations and information from this highly respected 
professional design organization. Some students 
graduating from graphic design proceed to graduate 
school. However, most go directly to work as profes- 
sional designers. 



Other Entrance Information Requested 

Q Additional Information on Architectural Artlsanry Program 




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Graphic Design Sample Curriculum 



Foundation Year 




Fall Semester 




Drawing #121 


3 credits 


2 D Design #111 


3 credits 


3 D Design #151 


3 credits 


English #H 100 


3 credits 


Readings in Western Civilization 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Drawing #122 


3 credits 


2D Design #112 


3 credits 


3D Design #152 


3 credits 


English #H 105 


3 credits 


Art History #VS 100 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Trial Major Year 




Fall Semester 




Design 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Design 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Humanities . 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Junior Year 




Fall Semester 




Design Major 


9 credits 


Production & Processes 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 8 credits 


Spring Semester 




Design Major 


9 credits 


Basic Photography 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 8 credits 


Senior Year 




Fall Semester 




Design Major 


9 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Business Management 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Design Major 


9 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Senior Seminar 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 



This is a sample curriculum only. Subject to change 
based on semester class schedules and individual 
needs. 





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Profile: Graphic Design Program 



Degrees Offered: B.F.A. 

Studio Space for Majors: 30 

Full-time Faculty: Eva Roberts, Mimi Parsons 

Square Footage: 6,000 

Location: Purchase Street Building 

Key Equipment Macintosh Computers, Apple HE 
Computers, Laser Writer Printer, AGFA Stat Cam- 
era, 2 Lucigraphs, VGC Typositor, Darkroom 



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METALS 



The Metal program teaches students the fundamen- 
tals of metalsmithing and the qualities and creative 
potential of ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Students 
experience a range of approaches to individually 
designed and wrought objects — from limited pro- 
duction pieces to one-of-a-kind jewelry. Aestheti- 
cally, work ranges from functional ware to sculptural 
object. Emphasis is placed on personal expression 
and development, as well as on concern for profes- 
sional standards of technique and design. The pro- 
gram aims to instill the self-confidence and the 
self-discipline necessary to sustain productive 
artistic careers. 

The beginning point is to learn metalsmithing; i.e. , 
the making of jewelry, holloware, flatware, and non- 
functional metal objects. However, students will be 
encouraged to explore the possibilities of "mixed 
media" in combination with metals. The second 
important aspect of the program is the emphasis on 
individual creativity and development of a student's 
sensitivity to good design. 

Processes and techniques include raising, forging, 
chasing-repousee, soldering, casting, toolmaking, 
finishing, enameling, anodizing, etching, stone- 
setting, and lapidary. Other technical areas are 
encountered as each student's need to create indi- 
vidual statements in metal evolves. 







"In many respects, teaching involves establishing dialogue. By interacting with students, one 
strives to provoke internal questioning, promote focussed exchange among peers and spark 
the engagement that takes place between the maker and materials. Seen this way, the teacher 
simply acts as a catalyst, accelerating a reaction." — Susan Hamlet 



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Visiting artists supplement faculty by giving 
special lectures, demonstrations, and critiques. 
The Metals faculty and students benefit from con- 
tacts established through attendance at the Society 
of North American Goldsmiths annual conference. 

The Metals facility includes a well equipped 
machine room, casting area, flat glass studio, forg- 
ing, and blacksmithing area. A strong inventory of 
raising stakes, hammers, anvils, mills, and shears 
are included. The enameling room contains three 
kilns and a specialized four station sink. Discreet 
areas for anodizing and etching are next to a small 
darkroom. The flat glass and glass engraving courses 
are supported by belt and wheel polishers, sand- 
blasters, a slumping and fusing kiln, and engraving 
equipment. Each major is provided an individually 
assigned work bench with a storage unit, a shared 
sink and hot working area. 




Although Metals majors explore jewelry 
techniques they also are encouraged to find 
other applications for metal working. 
Utilitarian objects, such as these containers, 
are difficult and exacting to execute. 




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Metals Sample Curriculum 


Foundation Year 




Fall Semester 




Drawing #121 


3 credits 


2 D Design #111 


3 credits 


3D Design #151 


3 credits 


English #H 100 


3 credits 


Readings in Western Civilization 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Drawing # 1 22 


3 credits 


2DDesign#M2 


3 credits 


3D Design #152 


3 credits 


English #H 105 


3 credits 


Art History #VS 100 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Trial Major Year 




Fall Semester 




Metals 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Metals 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Junior Year 




Fall Semester 




Metals Major 


9 credits 


Drafting 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 8 credits 


Spring Semester 




Metals Major 


9 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credrts 


Total 


18 credits 


Senior Year 




Fall Semester 




Metals Major 


9 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Business Management 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Metals Major 


9 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Senior Seminar 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 



This is a sample curriculum only. Subject to change 
based on semester class schedules and individual 
needs. 




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Degrees Offered: B.F.A., M.F.A. 

Studio Space for Majors: 30 

Full-time Faculty: J. Fred Woell, Susan Hamlet 

Square Footage: 14,000 

Location: Purchase Street Building 

Key Equipment: Centrifugal Casting Machine, 
Hoover Crucible Furnace, Gas and Coal Forge, Flat 
Glass and Lapidary Equipment, 5 Polishing 
Machines, 2 Sandblasters, Spinning and Machine 
Lathe, 5 Anvils, 2 Bandsaws, 2 Drill Presses, 
Aluminum Anodizing Set-up, Solder Stations 
Individual, 46 Individual Benches, 1 Plate Shear, 
Enamel Room, Small Dark Room for Photo Process 
Oxy/acetylene Area withBlacksmithing 



PAINTING 



The landscape of 
Southeastern New 
England is a con- 
stant source of 
subject matter for 
Swain painters. 



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In the history of art no discipline has been more 
critically analyzed or more influential than paint- 
ing. For western culture the two-dimensional sur- 
face has been a major visual forum and cultural 
barometer. At Swain, the painting program 
embraces the challenge of educating artists who 
can and will accept the inherent responsibilities 
of choosing to be a painter within such a tradition. 
Because the painting program believes that a com- 
plete understanding of the formal elements of color 
and composition are vital to individual pictorial 
expression, its curriculum places a strong emphasis 
in that direction. 

Building on the principles developed in the Founda- 
tion program, sophomore students learn to visualize 
and express themselves in oil paint — the tradi- 
tional medium of the painter. Students grow in their 
understanding of the nature of the medium; they 
explore new ways to see and mix colors; they expe- 
rience the use and control of brushes and palette 
knives on a variety of surfaces, such as papers and 




I keep coming back to the notion that the 
key to Swain's strength is it's small size. Now 
that statement is not meant to suggest that 
we are one big happy family. It does help to 
explain the way the program fits together. 
The intimacy of the institution helps to rein- 
force the individual faculty member's con- 
cern and knowledge of his or her students. 
These are characteristics that have always 
been true of the best art training from the 
time of the apprenticeship system to the 
modern workshops of Albers, Hofmann and 
Hayer. — David Smith 





canvas; they thoroughly examine theories of color 
harmony and composition; they learn to render the 
human anatomy by drawing and painting from live 
models. 

Painting students are encouraged to determine their 
own style, imagery and overall direction. 

Painting majors spend three full class days in indi- 
vidual, on-campus studios. The painting faculty use 
this time for studio visitations, individual critiques 
and technical seminars. In addition, upper level 
painting students meet regularly as a group, provid- 
ing time for collaboration, discussion and critique. 
Special sessions are scheduled for material demon- 
strations, field trips and critiques by visiting artists. 

Individual studio spaces for painting majors and 
painting and drawing open studios are located in the 
W.W. Crapo Building. The exhibition of contem- 
porary art in the Crapo building and some 3,000 
volumes on the history of painting and painters in 
the Melville Library serve as important educational 
resources for the painting majors. 



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Profile: Painting 



Degrees Offered: B.F.A. 

Full-time Faculty: Severin Haines, David Loeffler 
Smith 

Square Footage: 8,500 

Location: W.W. Crapo Building 

Key Equipment: 35 Drawing Horses 




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The Crapo Building is divided into individual 
painting studios with a choice of natural light 
sources. 



Painting Sample Curriculum 

Foundation Year 

Fall Semester 

Drawing #121 

2 D Design #111 

3D Design #151 

English #H 1 00 

Readings in Western Civilization 

Total 

Spring Semester 
Drawing # 1 22 
2 D Design #112 
3D Design #152 
English #H 1 05 
Art History #VS 1 00 
Total 




Fall Semester 

Painting Major 

Humanities 

Business Management* 

Total 



3 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 
/ 5 credits 

3 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 
/ 5 credits 



Trial Major Year 




Fall Semester 




Painting 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Life Drawing 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Painting 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Life Drawing 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Junior Year 




Fall Semester 




Painting Major 


9 credits 


Color Theory 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Total 


1 8 credits 


Spring Semester 




Painting Major 


9 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Total 


18 credits 



9 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 
/ 5 credits 

9 credits 
3 credits 
3 credits 
/ 5 credits 



This is a sample curriculum only. Subject to change 
based on semester class schedules and individual 
needs. 

* Painting majors may substitute an academic 
elective to fulfill this requirement. 



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Printmaking is a unique method 
of creating and transferring 
images that offers numerous 
possibilities for accumulation, 
repetition and transposition. 
Woodcut and engraving are 
among the earliest forms of 
printing and are still used by 
contemporary printmakers. 
These historic processes are fre- 
quently combined or modified 
through modern technologies 
and materials such as photo- 
silkscreen or Xerox transfer. 
Students have the option of mak- 
ing one-of-a-kind images (mono- 
printing) or serial images 
(edition printing). 



Students begin with instruction 
in the fundamental processes, 
etching, lithography, silkscreen 
and relief printmaking. They 
learn to use stones, plates, tools, 
and paper. Students also learn 
how to make their own paper. As 
they advance, students experi- 
ment with more sophisticated 
techniques. Majors in printmak- 
ing spend three full class days in 
their individual printmaking 
studios and meet regularly with 
the other printmaking majors for 
critiques and technical lectures. 
By graduation, students are 
expected to demonstrate profi- 
ciency in printing as well as a 
critical understanding of the 
appropriateness of the printmak- 
ing media to the visualization of 
their ideas. 

The studio experience is supple- 
mented by a program of visiting 
artists, gallery tours and field 
trips. The many commercial 
print galleries in Boston and the 
Museum of Fine Arts-Boston 
print collection provide the 
opportunity to view important 
original prints. The Melville 
Library's collection of books on 
printmaking and the periodicals 
also form an important informa- 
tion resource. 

The printmaking atelier located 
in the Purchase Street building is 
spacious, open, well-ventilated 
and sunny. The studio is divided 
into three main areas supporting 
water-base screen printing, litho- 
graphy, and etching. In addition, 
there is a paper preparation and 
storage area, a drawing area, a 
blueprint machine, an enclosed 
acid booth, a plate preparation 
area and a darkroom. We share 
with the Graphic Design pro- 
gram some of the photo- 
mechanical equipment and a 
critique/slide presentation room. 



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Printmaking Sample Curricul 


urn 


Foundation Year 




Fall Semester 




Drawing #121 


3 credits 


2 D Design #111 


3 credits 


3 D Design #151 


3 credits 


English #H 100 


3 credits 


Readings in Western Civilization 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Drawing #122 


3 credits 


2DDesign#M2 


3 credits 


3D Design #152 


3 credits 


English #H 105 


3 credits 


Art History #VS 100 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Trial Major Year 




Fall Semester 




Printmaking 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Printmaking 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Junior Year 




Fall Semester 




Printmaking Major 


9 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 8 credits 


Spring Semester ' 




Printmaking Major 


9 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Total 


18 credits 


Senior Year 




Fall Semester 




Printmaking Major 


9 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Business Management 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Printmaking Major 


9 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Senior Seminar 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 



This is a sampfe curriculum only. Subject to change 
based on semester class schedules and individual 
needs. 



The manipulation of color is an impor- 
tant feature of studying printmaking. 
Students explore issues of trans- 
parency, opacity, and color overlay in 
serigraphy, or silkscreen printmaking. 




Profile: Printmaking 



Degrees Offered: B.F.A. 

Full-time Faculty: Marc St. Pierre 

Square Footage: 4,000 

Location: Purchase Street Building 

Key Equipment: Dickerson Etching Press, American 
French Tool Etching Press, Dickerson Lithography 
Press, Griffin Lithography Press, 40 Litho Stones, 
Darkroom, 8 Silkscreen Tables, 2 Light Tables, 
1 Blueprint Machine, Aquatint Box, 3 Drying 
Racks, Plate Cutter, Brand Hot Plate 







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Etching plates can be shaped in order to 
create curvilinear images. 





SCULPTURE 



Swain's Sculpture program is demanding, both 
intellectually and physically. In the Foundation 
program, students explore the basic nature of three- 
dimensionality, especially the principles of volume, 
density, weight, mass, texture and scale. The sculp- 
ture program expands and extends the experience 
by teaching students to express ideas three- 
dimensionally as physical objects. By projecting 
visual concepts into three-dimensional space, sculp- 
ture creates objects that compete for attention with 
all other objects in the three-dimensional world. 
Sculpture doesn't just mean something, it is 
something. 



Faculty member 
Eric Lintala's 
sculpture is both 
objective and 
environmental. 





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A fundamental task for sculpture students is to 
identify and find the appropriate materials through 
which to express ideas. The sculpture program 
stresses the importance of traditional sculpture 
materials, such as metal, wood, clay and plaster as 
well as non-traditional materials, such as plastic, 
earth, fiber, paper, found objects, glass, and photo- 
graphic images. Students are encouraged to inte- 
grate a variety of materials in the execution of their 
work. 

Through close faculty instruction, students learn 
the various technical skills needed to manipulate the 
materials which they choose to work with. Special 
emphasis is placed on wood and steel fabrication 
techniques for all sculpture students, as well as 
developing safe and careful working habits. 

Students are strongly encouraged to exhibit their 
sculpture both within the studio and outside in the 
community. Visiting sculptors have frequently 
required the participation and assistance of the 
sculpture students with on-site installations, pro- 
viding a first-hand working experience with profes- 
sional sculptors. 

The facilities permit an exceptional opportunity for 
students to work from intimate to large scale. The 
large studio in the Purchase Street Building pro- 
vides space for a large inventory of industrial grade 
equipment and hand tools. In addition, Sculpture 
major students have individual studio spaces. The 
large, open studio design, allows students to better 
develop and learn from one another's experience. 



The construction 
of metal sculpture 
requires skill in 
welding and other 
fabricating tech- 
niques. Much of 
Swam students' 
metal sculpture 
ends up with 
painted surfaces. 
Below: 

Roxy Robert is a 
wall relief from the 
series "Roxy and 
Her Things" by 
Robin Taffler 




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This sculpture 
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encouraged to 
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and facilities in 
other areas of the 
college. 






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Degrees Offered: B.F.A. 

Full-time Faculty: Eric Lintala, Robin Taffler 

Square Footage: 10,000 

Location: Purchase Street Building 

Key Equipment: 2 Arc Welders, Oxy /acetylene Set- 
ups, Radial Arm Saw, Table Saw, Wood Band Saw, 
Metal Band Saw, Bench Grinder, Drill Press, Bench 
Sander, Variety of Power Hand Tools 





Sculpture Sample Curriculum 


Foundation Year 




Fall Semester 




Drawing #121 


3 credits 


2 D Design #111 


3 credits 


3D Design #151 


3 credits 


English #H 100 


3 credits 


Readings in Western Civilization 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Drawing # 1 22 


3 credits 


2 D Design #112 


3 credits 


3D Design #152 


3 credits 


English #H 105 


3 credits 


Art History #VS 100 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Trial Major Year 




Fall Semester 




Sculpture 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Sculpture 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Junior Year 




Fall Semester 




Sculpture Major 


9 credits 


Materials & Techniques 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Social Sciences 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 8 credits 


Spring Semester 




Sculpture Major 


9 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Total 


18 credits 


Senior Year 




Fall Semester 




Sculpture Major 


9 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Business Management 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Sculpture Major 


9 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Senior Seminar 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 



This is a sample curriculum only. Subject to change 
based on semester class schedules and individual 
needs. 



WOOD 



The Wood program focuses on wood as a primary 
medium and furniture as a primary application. 
Most students integrate various other media into 
their work. They are also free to explore the sculp- 
tural implications of their work. The intention of 
the wood program is to give the students broad 
skills which are required to pursue careers in the 
professional crafts world. While the program is 
specifically aimed at the individual who will work as 
a self-sustaining artist/craftsperson, the program can 
accommodate those who will work in the related 
professions of teaching, design, the furniture 
industry, and craft administration. 

The core of the curriculum is directed towards the 
aesthetic and technical aspects of designing and 
making furniture. The program also offers a compli- 
ment of courses in design, freehand and mechanical 
drawing, finishing, machine maintenance, busi- 
ness, and furniture history. 

The Wood trial majors review basic hand and 
machine tool techniques through a series of design 
projects and the construction of basic furniture 
objects. They are introduced to the principle of 
carcass and frame construction. Traditional methods 
of joinery as well as bending, laminating, and fin- 
ishing are stressed. 



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Majors work on more intensive furniture-related 
exercises in tightly structured sequences of plan- 
ning, decision-making, and execution. Projects 
gradually become larger and more complex. Ad- 
vanced demonstrations are given in plywood construc- 
tion, veneering, marquetry, tambour construction, 
upholstery, transparent and opaque finishing, jigs, 
fixtures and other limited production techniques. 

The Wood program is committed to the intellectual 



and artistic development of the students. The pro- 
gram is continually revising the curriculum and 
improving the facility to better meet shifting needs. 

The Wood program studio includes three separate 
benchrooms with professional wood worker benches 
and cabinets for each major, two extensive machine 
shops with basic to highly sophisticated equipment, 
and a spray and hard finish room designed to handle 
most types of hand applied and sprayed finishes. 




The Wood shop and studio is set up to support the creation of 
major projects requiring precision machine work and careful 
craftsmanship. The finishing room meets the top professional 
shop standards for safety and spaciousness. 



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Profile: Wood 



Degrees Offered: B . F. A , M . F. A . 

Studio Space for Majors: 3 

Full-time Faculty: Alphonse Mattia, Michael 
Pierschalla 

Square Footage: 10,000 

Location: Purchase Street Building 

Key Equipment: 3 Joiners, 3 Planers, 2 Lathes, 
Veneer Press, 2 Bandsaws, 4 Sanding Machines, 
Pneumatic Tools System, 2 Drillpresses, 3 Table 
Saws, 5' x 7' Spray Booth, 1 Horizontal Boring 
Machine, 1 Scroll Saw, 1 Mark IV Sharpening 
System, 1 Grinder, 1 Sharpener 



: 





"To be small in scale does not mean to be small in capacity. The size of the school and the structure of its curriculum work together to allow the 
student a lot of personal attention, aesthetic freedom and especially the opportunity to explore work in many media well beyond the surface 
goals of introductory courses. This goes a long way towards establishing an understanding of art as the holistic discipline it really is, and to 
providing a broad method by which they can interpret the phenomenon of their lives and our common culture. The important aspect of teaching 
to me is that any student be given the opportunity to develop something unique out of the event which happens when their individuality collides 
head on against some certain body of knowledge (crash!!!) In my own work, it is important to me to make of it whatever I want to. This is also the 
most frustrating thing about it." — Michael Pierschalla 



Fine woodworking depends in large 
measure upon the condition and range of 
tools available. Swain's tool inventory is large 
and of good quality. 




Wood Sample Curriculum 


Foundation Year 




Fall Semester 




Drawing #121 


3 credits 


2 D Design #111 


3 credits 


3D Design #151 


3 credits 


English #H 100 


3 credits 


Readings in Western Civilization 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Drawing # 1 22 


3 credits 


2 D Design #112 


3 credits 


3D Design #152 


3 credits 


English #H 105 


3 credits 


Art History #VS 100 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Trial Major Year 




Fall Semester 




Wood 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Wood 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Trial Major 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Junior Year 




Fall Semester 




Wood Major 


9 credits 


Drafting 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 8 credits 


Spring Semester 




Wood Major 


9 credits 


Studio Elective 


3 credits 


Art History 


3 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 8 credits 


Senior Year 




Fall Semester 




Wood 


9 credits 


Humanities 


3 credits 


Business Management 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 


Spring Semester 




Wood 


9 credits 


Social Science 


3 credits 


Senior Seminar 


3 credits 


Total 


/ 5 credits 



This is a sample curriculum only. Subject to change 
based on semester class schedules and individual 
needs. 



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MASTER OF 
FINE ARTS 
PROGRAM IN 
ARTISAN RY 



The Master of Fine Arts degree 
(M.F.A.) is a graduate level pro- 
gram which is studio intensive 
and complemented by art history 
and academic seminars. The 
degree is offered in the areas of 
Ceramics, Fiber, Metals, and 
Wood. An undergraduate degree 
with appropriate art credits is a 
prerequisite. Acceptance is based 
primarily on portfolio, personal 
motivation and potential. 

The graduate program is referred 
to as the Program in Artisanry for 
several reasons: The M.F.A. pro- 
gram with majors in Ceramics, 
Fiber, Metal, and Wood was 
transferred from Boston Univer- 
sity in 1985 where it originated. 
Swain, through a complex legal 
agreement, is acting as an agent 
of Boston University in order to 
assist P. I. A. students who need to 
complete the M.F.A. beyond its 
residence on the (B.U.) campus. 
Swain School of Design peti- 
tioned to amend its charter in 
October, 1985 to grant the 
M.F.A. degree. 

P.I. A. is committed to training 
self-sufficient artist-craftsmen 
capable of producing fine craft 
and art objects at a professional 
level. Emphasis is on both the 
expressive and technical quali- 
ties of the objects as well as a 
historical and philosophical 
understanding. 






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The structure of the M.F.A. pro- 
gram is based on a significant 
interchange between the students 
and their graduate committees. 
The goal of the graduates should 
be to aspire to individual excel- 
lence and contribute to the field 
in which they work. The M.F.A. 
candidates work closely with 
and are reviewed periodically by 
M.F.A. Committees throughout 
their studies. At the conclusion 
of the M.F.A. program, students 
write a thesis and prepare a thesis 
exhibit. A coherent body of work 
in the exhibit must meet the 
professional standards of the 
selected field. 

Both a two year and a three year 
Master of Fine Arts degree are 
offered. The two year M.F.A. is a 
60 credit hour degree that can be 
completed in a minimum of two 
years. The three year M.F.A. is a 
72 credit hour degree that can be 
completed in a minimum of 
three years. The three year option 
is available for those students 
who require portfolio develop- 
ment in the studio major. At the 
end of the first year of the three 
year option, the student will be 
evaluated by the student's major 
studio faculty for a decision on 
continuance in the program. 
Acceptance into either program 
does not guarantee completion of 
the M.F.A. degree. An interview 
with the faculty in the area of the 
applicant's choice is strongly 
recommended. During the inter- 
view the applicant may present 
actual pieces of work. 

The Program in Artisanry has 
been hailed as one of the finest 
crafts programs in the country 
and Swain School of Design 
wishes to promote the quality 
and build on the reputation. 

For further information and an 
application regarding the MFA 
program please write or call: 

Director of Admissions 

The Swain School of Design 

388 County Street 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 

02740 






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HOUSING 



Residence Hall The Swain School of Design owns 
and maintains two residence halls, both historic 
buildings. "Fairview", at 106 Washington Street, 
is a Greek Revival house built in 1845 by Henry 
Howland Crapo, a prominent New Bedford busi- 
nessman and nurseryman who later became Gov- 
ernor of Michigan. His only son, Wiliam Wallace 
Crapo, a United States congressman from Massa- 
chusetts, donated the WW Crapo Gallery to the 
School. Crapo's grandson and namesake, Henry 
Crapo II, was both trustee and President of the 
Swain School. Seventeen students, a Resident 
Assistant and a Residence Hall Director live at 
Fairview. 

The second residence hall is the Currier Building 
at 31 Hawthorn Street. This attractive shingle and 
clapboard structure was built in 1885 as Miss Lucy 
Leonard's School. It, subsequently, served as a 
private residence and in the 1930's was the home 
of Allan Dale Currier, who then was the Director 
of Swain. His family later gave the building to 
the Swain School which has used it for studio space, 
classrooms and as a faculty residence. In the Fall of 
1986, the Currier Building will become a residence 
for ten students and one Resident Assistant. 



Both Fairview and the Currier Building provide for 
double occupancy in most of the rooms. The college 
does not have a board plan, but residents may pre- 
pare meals in the kitchens of their respective 
dormitories. 

Residence Hall Fees In the 1986-87 academic year, 
the dormitory fee will be $2,000 a year or $1,000 a 
semester for a double occupancy room. A few single 
rooms will be available for the annual fee of $2,250. 
In addition, residents can expect to spend about 
$750 during the year for food which they prepare 
in the residence. Prior to occupancy, each residence 
must pay a dormitory maintenance deposit of $200. 

Applying For Residence Hall Space Residence hall 
space is allocated on a first-come, first-serve basis 
with priority consideration given to out-of-state 
freshmen and new out-of-state transfer students. 
Room assignments are made without regard to race, 
religion, or national origin. If students are inter- 
ested in residence hall occupancy, they should indi- 
cate on the application for admission and on other 
questionnaires which the college sends out. If the 
applicant is assigned a space in the residence, he/she 
will be expected to place a fifty dollar deposit to 
reserve a space. 




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Off-Campus Housing Swain maintains a housing 
service which processes information about rooms 
and apartments available to incoming students in 
the community. Referrals are made on the basis of 
the student's response to a questionnaire sent out by 
the Office of Student Affairs to determine financial 
considerations and the type of accommodations 
desired. Housing expenses are estimated in the 
Cost of Education section of this catalogue. Further 
questions may be directed to the Dean of Student 
Affairs. 

Food Service Although Swain does not offer a meal 
plan, it does offer a "home-style" food service open 
for light breakfast and lunch. 





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STUDENT LIFE 



Student Affairs The Office of 
Student Affairs assists students 
and answers questions about 
everything from educational 
objectives to off-campus hous- 
ing. The Office of Student 
Affairs provides help in such 
diverse areas as financial aid, 
health and counseling referrals, 
legal services, tutoring and 
money management. 



Faculty Advisors Faculty mem- 
bers play an important role in 
guiding the students. In the Fall, 
the Dean of Academic Affairs 
assigns each student a faculty 
advisor. The advisor is available 
to discuss academic matters as 
well as the student's general 
well-being. The student and the 
advisor are free to make appoint- 
ments whenever they feel it is 
necessary to meet. 



Student Activities All interested 
students are urged to join the 
Student Council which is respon- 
sible for student governance and 
for initiating extracurricular 
activities. Each year the Student 
Council sponsors a variety of 
extracurricular activities includ- 
ing social events and trips to 
museums and galleries in New 
York and Boston. 



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The Crapo Gallery brings a different 
exhibition of art work to Swain nearly 
every month during the academic year. 
The Gallery's purpose is to present 
alternative points of view and challenging 
new work to the students, faculty, and 
commumty-at-large for review and 
critique. 





Lecture series are a prominent 
feature in Swain's extracurricular 
life. Each major progam sponsors 
guest artists and speakers, as well 
as several school-wide lecture 
programs. Generous grants from 
the National Endowment for 
the Arts and the Massachusetts 
Council on the Arts and Human- 
ities have allowed Swain to bring 
nationally famous artists to the 
community. 



Our Gallery is another important 
element in the life of the college. 
Exhibiting some sixteen different 
shows each year, the gallery 
serves as a center for local arts 
activities. Gallery openings give 
students a chance to meet con- 
temporary artists and curators in 
a congenial and open atmosphere. 



For the covenience of students, 
Swain has a supply store on cam- 
pus. The supply store carries 
most of the supplies and books 
required for classes. The supply 
store also assembles a kit of books 
and hard-to-find materials for 
incoming students. 




"The Titanic" is one 
student's solution 
to a Freshman 3-D 
Design problem 
which requires the 
students to think 
more creatively 
about footwear. 



ADMISSIONS 



The Swain School of Design 
offers the opportunity to study 
with practicing artists at a pro- 
fessional college of art, design, 
and crafts. The application for 
admission should be regarded as 
a dialogue between the student 
and the college, through which 
both the college and the student 
learn more about each other. The 
student takes the responsibility 
for providing individual infor- 
mation in support of the appli- 
cation. The college takes the 

responsibility to insure that the 

applicant has every opportunity 

to form a frank and complete 

understanding of the Swain 

School of Design; its program, 

its environment and its potential 

value to the student as a visual 

artist. 

Eligibility All persons seeking 
admission to The Swain School 
of Design must possess a high 
school diploma or must have 
successfully completed the GED 
(General Educational Develop- 
ment) examination before they 
can matriculate. Admissions will 
be based on the degree to which 
Swain's educational programs can 
benefit the applicant. 

Admissions Policy The Swain 

School of Design maintains a 

rolling admissions policy. 

Although the college does not 

have a deadline for application, 

early application is recom- 
mended. Applications are 

reviewed on a continuing basis 
until all positions in the entering 
class are filled. Applicants are 
accepted in the order in which 
their complete applications are 
received. Applications may be 
submitted at any time but gen- 
erally between September and 
March for admissions for the fol- 
lowing Fall and by December 1 
for January admission. 









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55 I 56 



Admissions Decision The deci- 
sion on the application will 
reflect an assessment of the 
college's ability to meet the 
applicant's educational objec- 
tives. Ideally, the decision will be 
one on which the college and the 
student can both agree, since the 
college and the student will have 
reached the decision together. 

When all application procedures 
have been completed, applicants 
will receive notification of their 
admission status in writing. 
Candidates are notified of their 
admission status within two 
weeks after meeting all admis- 
sion requirements and criteria. 
Should the applicant be accepted 
to the Swain School of Design a 
hundred dollar commitment 
deposit will hold a place for the 
applicant. This non-refundable 
deposit will be applied to the 
applicant's first semester tuition. 



To apply for admission to the 
Swain School of Design, the 
applicant must submit the 
following: 

1 . The application found in the 
back of this catalog. 

2. A $25 non-refundable applica- 
tion fee. (Should the application 
fee represent an unusual financial 
hardship, the Admissions Direc- 
tor may waive the fee on the 
written request of a parent, art 
teacher, guidance counselor or 
social worker. ) 

3. A portfolio of artwork. 

4. A portfolio interview is 
required for those applicants 
living within a 100 mile radius 
of Swain. The interview will 
enable the applicant to have his/ 
her work evaluated by a profes- 
sional and to discuss goals and 
expectations. At this time, the 
applicant may also tour the cam- 
pus, view the studio space, and 
meet faculty and students. 




5 . Official transcripts from the 
applicant's high school or all 
colleges attended. The applicant 
should ask the high school to 
send a copy of his or her official 
academic transcript to the office 
of admissions. Unofficial or stu- 
dent copies of transcripts are 
not appropriate for admissions 
purposes. 

6. Two letters of recommenda- 
tion from people who are familiar 
with the applicant's work and/or 
character. (Art teachers, guidance 
counselors, etc.) 

The applicant is encouraged to 
take either the SAT or ACT tests 
before the end of the senior year 
in high school. Although the 
tests are not required for admis- 
sion, they do provide the Admis- 
sions Office with additional 
information about academic 
ability The SAT Code Number 
for the Swain School of Design is 
3803- The ACT Code Number 
for the Swain School of Design is 
1876. 

All materials should be addressed 
to: Director of Admissions 
The Swain School of Design 
388 County Street 
New Bedford, MA 02740. 



"Origins of a Logo," 
a short animated 
flip book, appears 
in the upper right 
hand corner of this 
catalog. 



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Portfolio The portfolio gives 
the college a clear indication of 
how the student may benefit 
from professional training in the 
visual arts. The college looks for 
signs of accuracy and indepen- 
dence in the way the student 
sees, and evidence of the ability 
to develop visual ideas. 

The portfolio should include a 
comprehensive presentation of 
10 to 15 pieces of the applicant's 
best, most recent work. The 
portfolio may include examples 
of drawing, painting, printmak- 
ing, design, photography and 
crafts. (The college has seen work 
presented of every imaginable 
'subject, including portraits, 
still-life studies, abstract 
designs, interiors, exteriors, 
light plugs, juke boxes, dogs, 
sewing machines, figures in 
space suits, figures posing, 
boyfriends, quilts, jewelry, 
girlfriends, plans for underwater 
cities, package designs for trick 
dice, stage sets, musical instru- 



ments, pots and ceramic can- 
dies.) Work in any medium is 
acceptable but the college has 
found that drawing from life 
represents the applicant's ability 
best. Swain strongly suggest that 
the applicant try to include at 
least three samples of drawing 
from observation (rather than 
copies of photographs). 

The portfolio should demonstrate 
the range of skills and ideas that 
the applicant is capable of deal- 
ing with. If a personal portfolio 
review with actual work is not 
possible, the applicant should 
send slides. All slides must be 
labeled with name, size, and 
medium. If applicants want their 
slides returned, they should 
include a self-addressed stamped 
envelope. 

Any questions (at all) regarding 
assembling the portfolio should 
be addressed to the admissions 
staff at Swain who will be most 
happy to help at (617) 997-7831. 



Transfer Admission Students 
who have attended another col- 
lege or university and wish to 
transfer to the Swain School of 
Design should apply according 
to the regular admission system 
listed previously. Applicants 
should have transcripts, includ- 
ing the final transcript, sent from 
the previous college or colleges 
attended, as well as from the 
high school attended. The port- 
folio should include recent work. 
Generally, a student will receive 
transfer credit for courses com- 
pleted with a grade of C or better 
taken at another college or uni- 
versity. However, transfer-credit 
courses must be applicable to the 
student's program at the Swain 
School of Design. A student 
must complete at least two full 
years at Swain in order to receive 
aB.F.A. degree. For additional 
information about the transfera- 
bility of specific courses, contact 
the registrar. 




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Part-Time Students Any indi- 
vidual may be admitted into 
credit courses of the school as a 
part-time student under the 
following conditions: 

1 . The applicant must possess a 
high school diploma or its 
equivalent. 

2. The applicant must submit a 
portfolio if enrolling for more 
than 6 credit hours. 

3. Space in the course must be 
available after full-time students 
have registered. 

Individuals applying under this 
classification pay no application 
fee, but they do pay the normal 
registration deposit and tuition 
charges. Course credits accrued 
as a part-time student may be 
counted toward the requirements 
for the Bachelor of Fine Arts and 
Master of Fine Arts degrees upon 
subsequent admission into a 
degree program. To enroll as a 
part-time student, contact the 
Director of Admissions. 

International Students 

The Swain School of Design 
welcomes residents of other 
countries who wish to study 
art, design and craft. Foreign 
nationals are expected to follow 
the school's admissions procedure 
already described. In addition, 
foreign nationals must: 

1. Submit certified English 
translations of all academic tran- 
scripts from secondary and post- 
secondary schools. 

2. If the applicant's first lan- 
guage is not English, arrange to 
take the Test of English as a For- 
eign Language (TOEFL Exam), 
administered several times a year 
in centers around the world. 
Since applicants must register for 
the exam several weeks before it 



is given, and since the exam 
results may not reach American 
colleges for another six weeks, 
candidates should make arrange- 
ments to take the exams well in 
advance of the semester they plan 
to enroll. For further information 
about the TOEFL Exam, write: 
TOEFL, Application Office, P.O. 
Box 899-R, Princeton, NJ 
08541-0010 U.S.A. 

3. As noted elsewhere, the appli- 
cant may send slides of work in 
the applicant's portfolio. 

4. The college realizes that the 
applicant may not be able to 
arrange for an interview if the 
applicant is outside the United 
States. However, the college 
hopes that the applicant will 
arrange to visit the Swain School 
of Design shortly after the appli- 
cant arrives in this country. 

5 . Please understand that United 
States federal financial assistance 
programs are available only to 
United States citizens and per- 
manent residents. State financial 
aid programs are only for resi- 
dents of the state concerned. 

6. Because the Swain School of 
Design cannot assume financial 
responsibility for its students and 
because international students 
are not eligible for many forms 
of financial aid, the school must 
be certain that citizens of other 
countries have sufficient funds 

to study and live in the United 
States for the duration of their 
college career. Therefore, at the 
time the applicant applies, the 
Admissions Office will send the 
applicant a form to be completed 
by the applicant's parent or 
guardian if the applicant is less 
than twenty-one years of age, or 
by the applicant's bank if the 
applicant is twenty-one or older. 



Completion of the form will 
establish that the applicant's 
parent or guardian has sufficient 
funds to pay the tuition and fees 
of the Swain School of Design 
and to pay all of the applicant's 
living, health, and incidental 
expenses for the period the appli- 
cant will be at the Swain School 
of Design. The college must 
receive this statement before it 



can act on the application for 
admission. 

7. The college will send the 
applicant an 1-20 form, needed 
for a student visa, only after the 
applicant has been officially 
admitted to the Swain School of 
Design, and after the college has 
received from the applicant the 
one hundred dollar commitment 
deposit signifying the applicant's 
intention to enroll. 



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The Family Educational Rights and 
Privacy Act Section 438 of the 
General Education Provisions 
Act, as amended, also referred to 
as the Family Education Rights 
and Privacy Act of 1974, was 
enacted by the Federal Govern- 
ment in 1974 with a view to 
protecting the privacy of stu- 
dents in certain educational insti- 
tutions. This statute governs 
access to official records directly 
related to students which are 
maintained by educational insti- 
tutions. It also limits the release 
of certain records to third parties 
and contains provisions permit- 
ting students to challenge the 
contents of certain records. It is 
the policy of the Swain School of 
Design to comply with this stat- 
ute, as amended, and the related 
rules and regulations in imple- 
mentation issued b.y the United 
States Department of Education. 



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Non-Discrimination Policy 
In accordance with the Civil 
Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX 
of the Educational Amendments 
of 1972, The Swain School of 
Design admits students of any 
race, color, age, sex or national 
and ethnic origin to all the 
rights, privileges, programs and 
activities generally accorded or 
made available to students at the 
School. It does not discriminate 
on the basis of race, handicap, 
age, sex, color or national and 
ethnic origin in the administra- 
tion of its employment policies, 
admissions policies, scholarship 
and loan programs, or other 
school-administered programs. 
Inquiries regarding compliance 
with the Civil Rights Act of 
1964 and Title IX may be 
directed to the Dean of Student 
Affairs, The Swain School of 
Design, or to the Director 
of the Office of Civil Rights, 
Department of Education, 
Washington, D.C. 

The Swain School of Design 
reserves the right to change, 
at any time and without prior 
notice, its course offerings, fees, 
calendar, rules, regulations, or 
procedures stated in this cata- 
logue or elsewhere. Swain School 
of Design also reserves the right 
to retain student work from time 
to time for exhibitions, promo- 
tions, and other institutional uses. 




TRUSTEES, ADMINISTRATION, & FACULTY 



Board of Trustees 

Mr. Robinson C. Trowbridge 

Chairman 

Chairman of the Board, 

Robinson C. Trowbridge, Inc. 

Westport Harbor, Massachusetts 

Mr. Mark L. Schmid 
Vice Chairman 

Partner, Dewing & Schmid, 
Architects, Inc. 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Dr. William C. Wild, Jr. 

Vice Chairman 

Executive Vice President 

Southeastern Massachusetts 

University 

North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 

Mr. Ernest C. Frias, Treasurer 
President, Luzo Bank & Trust 
Company (Retired) 
New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Mr. Timothy J. Cotter 

Assistant Treasurer 

President & Chief Executive Officer 

Fall River Five Cents Savings Bank 

Fall River, Massachusetts 

Mr. Clifford R. Carlson, Clerk 
Chairman of the Board 
Bank of New England — 
Bristol County, N. A. 
Fall River, Massachusetts 

Mr. William C. Shattuck 

Assistant Clerk 

Graphic Artist 

South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 

Ms. Elizabeth Isherwood 
Senior Vice President 
Moore & Isherwood, Inc. 
New Bedford, Massachusetts 



Mr. William N. Makepeace 
Executive Vice President (Retired) 
Corp Brothers, Inc. 
Providence, Rhode Island 

Mr. Scott Nash 
Director, Boston Office 
Corey & Company: 
Designers, Inc. 
Boston, Massachusetts and 
New York, New York 

Mr. Peter M. Nicholson 
Attorney At Law 
Prescott, Bullard & McLeod 
New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Mr. David L. Smith 

Professor of Painting 

The Swain School of Design 

Mr. Sumner J. Waring, Jr. 
President and Treasurer, 
Waring-Ashton Funeral Homes 
Fall River and Swansea, 
Massachusetts 

Mrs. Marion Wilner 
Associate Professor of Art 
Director, Art Transfer Program 
Bristol Community College 
Fall River, Massachusetts 

Ms. Margaret D. Xifaras 
Attorney At Law 
Lang, Straus, Xifaras & Bullard 
New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Dr. Manuel Pracana-Martins 
Diplomatic Liaison 
Consul of Portugal 

Scott W Lang, Esquire 

Legal Counsel 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 



Honorary Trustees 

Mrs. William Coykendall 

Painter 

South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 

Mrs. Helen K. Goddard 

South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 

Mr. Eldredge H. Leeming 

Consultant 

Hilton Head Island, 

South Carolina 

Mr. George C. Perkins 
Attorney At Law 
George C. Perkins, PC. 
New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Mr. William H. Potter 
Chairman of the Board (Retired) 
Fairhaven Marine, Inc. 
Fairhaven, Massachusetts 

Mr. Julian Underwood 

Painter 

South Dartmouth, Massachusetts 



Administrative List 

Bruce H. Yenawine 

President 

B.A. University of Louisville, KY 

M.A. University of Louisville, KY 

Michael Croft 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 

B.E A. University of New Mexico 

M.F.A. Southern Illinois 

University 

Peter Blunsden 
Residence Hall Director 
Southeastern Mass. University 

Louise DeMello 

Bookkeeper 

A. A. Liberal Arts, 

Bristol Community College 

B.A. Southeastern Massachusetts 

University 

Anna Fram, Secretary 
Architectural Artisanry Program 
Diploma, Plaza Business School 

Sally Goodman 

Recruiter 

B.A. Hart wick College 

B.E A. Boston University 

M.F.A. Rhode Island School of 

Design 

Martine Hargreaves 

Librarian 

B.A. Southeastern Massachusetts 

University 

Lili Hsing 

Director of Personnel 

Diploma, Hautes Etudes 

Commerciales, Canada 

Fashion Academy, New York City 

Kevin Jordan 
Coordinator, Architectural 
Artisanry Program 
B.A. Merrimack College 
Ph.D. Rutgers University 

Barbara A. Lynch 
Assistant to the President and 
Executive Office Manager 
Diploma, Kinyon-Campbell 
Business School 
Southeastern Massachusetts 
University 



Philip Marshall 

Director of Architectural Artisanry 

Program 

B.A. Brown University 

M.S. in Historic Preservation, 

University of Vermont 

Peggi E. Medeiros 

Director of Public Relations 

B.A. Southeastern Massachusetts 

University 

Nancy Pantaleoni 

Supply Store Manager 

B.E A. Oklahoma State University 

Pamela Paynton 
Director of Financial Aid 
B.A. Lafayette College 

Susan Joy Sager 

Registrar 

B.A. Hampshire College 

Diploma, Lake Placid Art School 

Patricia Scott 
Dean of Student Affairs 
A.B. Brown University 
M.Ed. Boston University 
M.A. Boston University 

Gertrude Southworth 

Director of Finance 

B.A. Southeastern Massachusetts 

University 

Robin Taffler 

Director of Admissions 

B.E A. Kansas City Art Institute 

M.F.A. Cranbrook Academy 

of Art 

Richard Taylor, Jr. 

Director of Facilities Planning & 

Operation 

B.Sc. Civil Engineering, 

Southeastern Massachusetts 

University 

Ellen Watson 

Supply Store Clerk 

Colleen M. Wetterland 

Assistant to the Director of Admissions 

A.S. Secretarial Science, Bristol 

Community College 

A.S. Word Processing, Bristol 

Community College 



Diane Wilkinson 

Executive Secretary and Assistant to 
the Vice President 
A.S. Secretarial Science, Bristol 
Community College 

Buildings and Ground Staff 

Fred Gomes 

Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds 

Kurtis Anacleto 
Maintenance Assistant 

David Monteiro 

Maintenance Assistant 

Faculty 

Jacqueline Block 
Associate Professor, Painting 
B.E A. , Cooper Union 

James Bobrick 

Professor, Liberal Arts 

A.B., Ph.D., Boston University 

Richard Dougherty 
Professor, Foundations 
B.E A., M.F.A., Maryland 
Institute, College of Art 

Barbara Eckhardt 

Assistant Professor, Fibers I Textile 

Design 

B.E A., Cleveland Institute of Art 

M.F.A. , Cranbrook Academy of 

Art 

Barbara Goldberg 

Assistant Professor, Fibers/Textile 

Design 

B.A., M.A., Boston University 

Christopher Gustin 
Assistant Professor, Ceramics 
B.E A. , Kansas City Art Institute 
M.F.A. , New York State College 
of Ceramics 

Severin Haines, B.E A., M.F.A. 

Associate Professor, Painting 

B.E A. , The Swain School of 

Design 

M.F.A., Yale University 



Susan H. Hamlet 

Associate Professor, Metals I Jewelry 

B.A., Mount Holyoke College 

M.F.A., Rochester Institute of 

Technology 

Richard A. Hirsch 

Professor, Ceramics 

B.S. State University of 

New York, New Palz 

M.F.A., Rochester Institute of 

Technology 

Charles E. Licka 

Professor, Liberal Arts 

B.A., M.A., University of 

Colorado 

Ph.D. candidate, University 

of Washington 

Eric Lintala 

Assistant Professor, Sculpture 

B.F.A., M.F.A., Kent University 

Philip Marshall 
Architectural Artisanry Program 
B.A., Brown University 
M.S. in Historic Preservation, 
University of Vermont 

Benjamin Martinez 
Assistant Professor, Painting 
B.E A. , Cooper Union 

Alphonse Mattia 

Associate Professor, Woodl Furniture 

B.E A. , Philadelphia College 

of Art 

M.F.A., Rhode Island School 

of Design 

Mimi Parsons 

Instructor, Design 

B.Sc. Kent State University 

M.F.A., Rhode Island School 

of Design 

Michael Pierschalla 

Instructor, Wood 

Rochester Institute of Technology 

B.E A. , Appalachian Center for 

Crafts 

Eva Roberts 

Assistant Professor, Design 
Bachelor of Environmental Design 
Master of Product Design 
North Carolina State University 
School of Design 



Marc St. Pierre 
Associate Professor, Printmaking 
B.E A., Laval Universite 
M.F.A., Southern Illinois 
University, Edwardsville 

Patricia E. Scott 
Assistant Professor, Liberal Arts 
A.B., Brown University 
M.Ed., M.A., Boston University 

David Loeffler Smith 

Professor, Painting 

Hans Hofmann School 

B.A., Bard College 

M.E A. , Cranbrook Academy 

of Art 

Robin Taffler 

Associate Professor, Sculpture 

B.E A. , Kansas City Art Institute 

M.E A. , Cranbrook Academy 

of Art 

J. Fred Woell 

Professor, Metals 

B.A., B.F.A., University of 

Illinois, Urbana 

M.S., M.E A., University of 

Wisconsin 









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TUITION & FEES 



For the 1986-87 academic year, 
the tuition for full-time under- 
graduate and graduate study ( 12 
credits or more, but less than 19) 
is $6, 100 a year, or $3,050 per 
semester. For less than full-time 
study, the tuition is $260 per 
credit hour. A commitment 
deposit of $ 100 is due upon reg- 
istration for each semester. Pre- 
registration during scheduled 
dates as determined by the aca- 
demic calendar is necessary to 
insure choice of courses. Finan- 
cial Aid Application must be 
correctly completed and mailed 
no later than March 1. Late proc- 
essing of Financial Aid Applica- 
tions will cause a delay or denial 
in receiving federal, state, and/or 
school funds. Full tuition and 
fees for each semester is due and 
payable by the 15 th of August 
and December. No student is 
allowed to attend class prior to meet- 
ing all financial obligations. Swain 
offers a payment plan through 
Academic Management Services. 
Please contact our Financial Aid 
Office for further information. 
Other fees and deposits described 
in this catalogue are listed below. 



Application Fee 




(non-refundable) 


$25 


Commitment Deposit 


$100 


Residence Hall Advance 




Deposit 


$50 


Residence Hall 




Maintenance Deposit 


$200 


Residence Hall Room 




Per Year 


$2000 


Student Activities Fee 


$25 


Student I.D. Card 


$10 



Please note: The above does not 
include some fees and expenses 
incurred by students in majors 
with unusual studio or materials 
requirements. 

Refund Of Tuition Students 
withdrawing from the college 
within the first two weeks of 
school receive a 75% tuition 
refund but forfeit the commit- 
ment deposit. After the first two 
weeks of school; no refund of 
tuition is available. 

Cost Of Education Although 
costs are likely to change 
annually, the approximate total 
cost of undergraduate or graduate 
education at the Swain School of 
Design for the 1986-87 academic 
year can be estimated as follows: 





On Campus 


Apartment 


Commuter 


Tuition 


$ 6,100 


$ 6,100 


$ 6,100 


Books & Supplies 


750 


750 


750 


Room & Board 


2,900 


3,150 


1,125 


Transportation 


400 


400 


1,300 


Personal Expenses 


700 


700 


700 




$10,850 


$11,100 


$ 9,975 



FINANCIAL 
AID 



Over eighty percent of the stu- 
dents at the Swain School of 
Design receive some form of 
financial aid. Many programs 
exist to help students meet edu- 
cational costs which exceed the 
funds available to them and their 
families. Therefore, the Swain 
School of Design encourages all 
applicants and all students to 
apply for financial assistance. 
Students at the Swain School of 
Design may receive three princi- 
pal forms of financial assistance: 

1 . Grants are funds given to the 
student without requiring the 
student to earn or repay the 
money. Several kinds of grants 
are available: 

a) Pell Grants, which are pro- 
vided by the United States 
Government. 

b) Supplemental Educational 
Opportunity Grants (SEOG), 
also provided by the federal 
government. 

c) Swain School of Design Schol- 
arships, awarded by the school 
to full-time students. 

d) State scholarships, provided 
by Massachusetts, Rhode 
Island, and many other states 
to their residents. 

e) Other scholarships and grants 
provided by independent 
agencies. 

2. Employment opportunities are 
provided during the school 
year and in the summer 
through the College Work- 
Study Program. 

3. Loan Programs permit students 
and their parents to borrow 
funds at favorable rates of 
interest. Some loan programs 
are: 

a) National Direct Student Loan 
(NDSL), available to most 
students. 

b) Guaranteed Student Loan 
(GSL), available to most 
students. 




c) Parent Loan for Undergradu- 
ate Students (PLUS) available 
to most parents. 

The federal government requires 
that a student must be certified 
by the School as maintaining 
satisfactory academic progress in 
his or her course of study before 
receiving any federal financial 
aid. The Director of Financial 
Aid will send each recipient 
detailed information on the 
"satisfactory progress" require- 
ment when the awards are made. 

How To Apply For Financial Aid 
The Swain School of Design 
strongly urges all applicants and 
prospective applicants for admis- 
sion to apply for financial aid by 
following the preliminary steps 
below: 

1. Complete the Inquiry Post 
Card in this Catalog and mail 
it to The Director of Financial 
Aid at The Swain School of 
Design. If the postcard is 
missing, the applicant should 
contact the Financial Aid 
Office, so the staff can send 
out the necessary materials. 

2. Indicate on the Application 
for Admission that the appli- 
cant is interested in financial 
aid. 

3. Upon receipt of the postcard 
and/or the application, Swain 
will send the applicant the 
Financial Aid Form (FAF) 
and other materials. 



4. Complete the Financial Aid 
Form (FAF) and submit it to 
the College Scholarship Serv- 
ice soon after January 1 of the 
year in which the applicant 
plans to attend college during 
the 1986-87 school year, the 
applicant should file his/her 
FAF soon after January 1, 
1987. The Swain School of 
Design code is 3803. 

5 . Follow other procedures sug- 
gested by the Financial Aid 
Office. 

6. Be sure to observe deadlines. 
Deadlines for some state pro- 
grams, noted on the (FAF), 
are as early as February. 

7 . Please understand that the 
applicant applies for financial 
aid in general and not for 
specific grants or loans. If the 
applicant is eligible for aid, 
the Financial Aid Office will 
work with the applicant to 
determine his/her eligibility. 

8 . Please take advantage of 
Swain's experience with finan- 
cial aid. Personnel in the 
Financial Aid and Admissions 
Offices will be happy to 
answer any questions. 



MAPS 



1. Fairview Dormitory 

2. Rodman Building 

3. Annex 

4. Currier Building 

5 . Melville Library 

6. Swain Bookstore 

7 . Crapo Building 

8. President's Residence 

9. Elm Street Building 

10. Purchase Street Building 



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